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Felix Charpentier (French, 1858-1924)

Born in Bollène, France in 1858, Felix Maurice Charpentier moved to Paris, studying under Pierre-Jules Cavelier at the École des Beaux-Arts. He began exhibiting at Salon in 1882 with allegorical works, but it wasn’t until 1887 that his works gained any real recognition; “L’Improvisateur” won him the second-class medal at the Salon and was subsequently acquired by the Musée Du Luxembourg. He exhibited extensively, winning first and second class medals, eventually being decorated with the title of Officier of the Legión d’Honneur. An avid sculptor of the Art Nouveau spirit, a great sense of force, power and expression characterize his works of art, much of his work seeking to understand and communicate the curiosity of nature that so permeated the period. His monumental works are perhaps his most recognizable contributions, L’Art Contemporain at the Grand Palais and two reliefs “La Navigation” and “Le Vapeur” decorating the facade of the Gare de Lyon. Charpentier died in Paris in December of 1924. 

References and Further Reading:

  • Bronzes: Founders and Sculptors 1800-1930, Harold Berman
  • Bronzes of the Nineteenth Century: Dictionary of Sculptors, Kjellberg, p. 202-203
  • Art Bronzes, Forrest, p. 67-68, p. 473
  • E. Benezit: Dictionary of Artists, Vol. III, Gründ, 2006, p. 808